Life at

Port Loop
 
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Port Loop is a 43-acre, canal-side site in Birmingham, just 15 mins from the city centre offering 1,150 new homes, retail and leisure spaces.

 
 

 
 
Birmingham's brand new

waterside neighbourhood

The island of Icknield Port Loop was at the epicentre of the industrial revolution. And now a different sort of revolution is transforming it once again. Introducing Port Loop: a new 43-acre neighbourhood, including over 1000 homes, a community hub, commercial office spaces, a new leisure centre and a swimming pool.

There’s also a sense of freedom and play built into the fabric of the neighbourhood’s urban island design, with traffic-free green streets, communal gardens, public parks and playgrounds. This is a place to relax, get outdoors, get to know your neighbours and let children run free.

 
 
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Feel connected

to the city

Port Loop is nestled between Birmingham Canal Old Line and the Birmingham Canal, just a 15-minute walk from Birmingham city centre. Its island location was once the industrial heart of the city, so the tow paths that served it provide superb, direct routes to the city centre. You can go by foot or jump on a bike. You could even take the water bus.

With tranquil Edgbaston Reservoir 5 minutes to the north and buzzing Brindleyplace just 15 minutes away to the south, it really is brilliantly connected.

 
 
 
Location
 

 
 
Tubeworks

Your community hub

As part of our Port Loop masterplan, we’ll be redeveloping a 100,000 sq. ft. industrial space to create Tubeworks. Plans are under discussion for this social, community and cultural hub, It could include a coffee shop, co-working space, a parcel delivery hub, a bike repair shop, rehearsal spaces, workshops, kitchens, markets, a crèche, a bakery or a micro-brewery. Whatever the final range of services, Tubeworks will be the vibrant heart of life on the island.

 
 
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Rich in

industrial heritage

The arrival of the canal in 1769 transformed the city of Birmingham into the city of a thousand trades. Engineered by James Brindley, the canal followed the contours of the landscape and now forms the eastern boundary of the island that Port Loop calls home.

Stroll down the scenic tow path to the city centre and you’ll walk through one of the powerhouses of the industrial revolution, its distinctive red brick buildings now enjoying a new lease of life as bars, businesses and cool places to eat.